School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Miss Janice Li

Janice

Email: chauyi.li@qmul.ac.uk
Room Number: Peter Landin, CS 440

Teaching

Big Data Processing (Undergraduate)

Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming. The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures. Queen Mary has been actively involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, you will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain first hand experience in relevant techniques. Laboratory work will be based on the MPI (Message Passing Interfaces) standard, running on a network of PCs in the teaching laboratory. The module should be of interest to Computer Scientists and those following joint programmes (eg CS/Maths, CS/Stats). It is also suitable for Chemistry and Engineering students and all those who are concerned with the application of high performance parallel computing for their particular field of study (eg Simulation of chemical Behaviour). The 12-week module involves two hours of timetabled lectures per week. Laboratory sessions are timetabled at two hours per week, normally spanning half the semester only. The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance. In addition, it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise you with messagepassing systems (MPI) as adopted by the industry.

Big Data Processing (Postgraduate)

The 12 week module involves 2 hours of timetabled lectures per week. Laboratory sessions are timetabled at 2 hours per week for 6 to 7 weeks only. The module syllabus adopts a hands-on programming stance. In addition it focuses on algorithms and architectures to familiarise students with message-passing systems ((MPI) as adopted by industry. Parallel computing, which implies the simultaneous execution of several processes for solving a single problem, is a mainstream subject with wide ranging implications for computer architecture, algorithms design and programming. The UK has been at the forefront of this technology through its involvement in the development of several innovative architectures.Queen Mary has been involved with Parallel Computing for more than a decade. In this module, students will be introduced to parallel computing and will gain firsthand experience in relevant techniques.

Data Mining (Undergraduate)

Data that has relevance for decision-making is accumulating at an incredible rate due to a host of technological advances. Electronic data capture has become inexpensive and ubiquitous as a by-product of innovations such as the Internet, e-commerce, electronic banking, point-of-sale devices, bar-code readers, and electronic patient records. Data mining is a rapidly growing field that is concerned with developing techniques to assist decision-makers to make intelligent use of these repositories. The field of data mining has evolved from the disciplines of statistics and artificial intelligence. This module will combine practical exploration of data mining techniques with a exploration of algorithms, including their limitations. Students taking this module should have an elementary understanding of probability concepts and some experience of programming.

Project (Undergraduate)

A design, development or research project in the field of electronic engineering, to be taken by all final-year BEng students registered for a BEng programme of study in Electronic Engineering. Not open to Associate Students or students from other departments.

Project (Undergraduate)

A design, development or research project in the field of electronic engineering, to be taken by all final year MEng students registered for an MEng programme of study in Electronic Engineering. This module aims: * to give students experience of managing their own time to complete a project in engineering design, development, or research which is initially specified only in terms of the final desired outcome * to teach students to develop a professional approach in their project work and to develop their communication skills, both written and oral, to a standard expected by industry of a new graduate.

Project (Undergraduate)

This individual project on a suitable subject under academic supervision will require an extensive literature review, good technical implementation and evaluation skills combined with the ability to undertake independent critical analysis. Assessment is by written report and viva. The value of this module is worth more than its nominal 30 credit weighting. The project is seen as an excellent indicator of a student's overall ability to carry out a serious piece of work, and consequently employers are likely to be impressed by competence shown. It will give you a topic of conversation at your job interview. Some professional organisations, such as IEE, only accept a degree as a valid precondition of membership if it includes a substantial individual project. This module is compulsory for the degree title G401 MSci in Computer Science. Online information is available from https://intranet.dcs.qmul.ac.uk/courses/coursenotes/projects/bsc/ Not open to Associate Students

Project (Work based)

This module is only open to degree apprentices in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science. Students will identify a significant hardware /software problem to solve from their workplace context, in conjunction with their project supervisor and their employer. To meet the problem requirements and design and implement a satisfactory solution within the time constraints, the students will have to apply the principles learnt in their previous taught modules.

Project (Undergraduate)

Written and verbal reports on the design and implementation of a software (or software and hardware) system. The aim of the project is to produce a quality product with limited resources. The project tests both technical ability and organisation, communication and evaluation skills. The value of this module is worth more than its nominal 30 credit weighting. The project is seen as an excellent indicator of a student's overall ability to carry out a serious piece of work, and consequently employers are likely to be impressed by competence shown. It will give you a topic of conversation at your job interview. Some professional organisations, such as IEE, only accept a degree as a valid precondition of membership if it includes a substantial individual project. As G400 Computer Science is accredited by BCS this module is compulsory for this degree title. Online information is available from https://intranet.dcs.qmul.ac.uk/courses/coursenotes/projects/bsc/. Not open to Associate Students.

Web Programming (Undergraduate)

Many computer systems are now accessed through a web interface. This module provides an in-depth and practical study of techniques for programming the web. Students will become proficient in a modern web development framework using PHP for sever programming and Javascript for client programming. The strengths and weaknesses of the framework are evaluated considering issues including authentication, security, session management, cross languages (PHP, SQL, Javascript) consistency and abstraction of the server-client interface. Different architecture styles are compared, including REST and AJAX and the use of JSON. Techniques for testing and for engineering web systems that behave robustly under high load are also covered.

Research