School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science

Ms Jane Reid

Jane

Senior Lecturer & Director of Development

Email: jane.reid@qmul.ac.uk
Telephone: +44 20 7882 5812
Room Number: Peter Landin, CS 309
Website: http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/~jane
Office Hours: Tuesday 13:00-14:00

Teaching

Communicating and Teaching Computing: the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme (Undergraduate)

Students will typically begin by observing the teacher's handling of the class and progress from this classroom assistant stage through small teaching tasks to at least one opportunity to undertake whole class teaching, possibly for a short part of a lesson. They will represent and promote computing and related subjects more generally as a potential university choice. Students will undertake and evaluate a special project on the basis of discussion with the teacher. This may involve a specific in-class teaching problem or an extra-curricular project such as a lunchtime club or special coaching periods for higher ability pupils. The student will keep a journal of their own progress in working in the classroom environment, and they will be asked to submit a reflective written report on the special project and other relevant aspects of the school placement experience. This format is standard within the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme (www.uas.ac.uk).

Graphical User Interfaces (Postgraduate)

Computers are tools that people interact with and through for work and pleasure. Nowadays computers are ubiquitous and are fundamental to all sorts of devices such as washing machines, cars, mobile phones, airplanes, televisions, and musical instruments. However, it is still very difficult to design user interfaces which are simple, intuitive, and easy to use you only have to look at the number of help books (e.g. the proliferation of books with titles such as 'the idiots guide to ') and modules to realise that designers often simply fail to make interfaces usable. This course introduces you to basic concepts of psychology and communication which inform the way in which interfaces should be designed. The course comprises lectures, problem classes, and lab sessions.

Graphical User Interfaces (Undergraduate)

Computers are tools that people interact with and through for work and pleasure. Nowadays computers are ubiquitous and are fundamental to all sorts of devices such as washing machines, cars, mobile phones, airplanes, televisions, and musical instruments. However, it is still very difficult to design user interfaces which are simple, intuitive, and easy to use; you only have to look at the number of help books (eg the proliferation of books with titles such as 'the idiots guide to') to realise that designers often simply fail to make interfaces usable. This module introduces you to basic concepts of psychology and communication, which inform the way in which interfaces should be designed. The centre of the module is the hands-on coursework undertaken in small teams where you will design, prototype, and evaluate interactive user interfaces for a specific set of user requirements. The module comprises lectures, problem classes, and lab sessions.

Industrial Placement Project (Undergraduate)

The Industrial Experience (IE) year consists of one year spent working with an appropriate employer in a role that relates directly to your field of study. The year is undertaken between the second and fourth years of your degree programme. Aims To provide a route to develop genuine and practical skills in a professional context relevant to the degree subject. To enable students to gain a better understanding of their own abilities, aptitudes, attitudes and employment potential. In addition the industrial placement will enhance the final year of the degree programme through an increased appreciation of the taught material.

MSc Industrial Placement Project (Postgraduate)

The industrial placement project consists of 8-12 months spent working with an appropriate employer in a role that relates directly to your field of study. The placement is undertaken between the taught component and the project. This will provide you with the opportunity to apply the key technical knowledge and skills that you have learnt in your taught modules, and will enable you to gain a better understanding of your own abilities, aptitudes, attitudes and employment potential. The module is only open to students enrolled on a programme of study with integrated placement.

Project Management for Big Data Analysis (Work based)

This module will provide degree apprentices with the methodological skills to manage a big data project, both in terms of managing time/schedule and in terms of tools and technologies. It will encompass the whole data analysis pipeline, including obtaining and checking data, analysis, results evaluation, and feedback loop to evolve/improve the process. Degree apprentices will also gain practical experience in applying the taught methodology to data drawn from their own workplace context.

Team Project (Undergraduate)

This is a group project where you will undertake an extended examination of a given topic. The assessment will be by group report and group viva, followed by an individual viva where candidates will discuss their contribution. The project tests group-working skills, technical ability and organisation, communication and evaluation skills. This team project, undertaken with supervision from a member of academic staff, requires students to undertake scientific investigation on a chosen research topic. The roles within the group should be complementary and all members will be assessed on both their individual contribution and also on the final group thesis. Group members will have to work together on project management issues (eg efficient and effective division of work) and to plan for the integration of individual contributions in the bigger picture of the team project. The project is seen as an excellent indicator of a student's overall ability to carry out a serious piece of work, and consequently employers are likely to be impressed by competence shown. It will give you a topic of conversation at your job interview. This module is compulsory for the degree title G401 MSci in Computer Science. Online information is available from https://intranet.dcs.qmul.ac.uk/courses/coursenotes/projects/bsc/ Not open to Associate Students.

Research

Research Interests:

My research interests lie in user-related issues in information retrieval (IR), focusing in particular on information seeking behaviour in different contexts, e.g. structured documents. I have also worked on user-centred evaluation of IR systems and interface design for IR systems. I have a developing interest in distance learning, and have strong links with Queen Mary?s Open and Distance Learning (ODL) Unit. My work adopts a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing from such areas as information science, languages and experimental psychology, as well as different areas of computer science, e.g. human-computer interaction.

Publications

  • Reid J, Lalmas M, Finesilver K et al. (2006). Best entry points for structured document retrieval - Part 1: Characteristics. nameOfConference


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    Citations: 5
  • Reid J, Lalmas M, Finesilver K et al. (2006). Best entry points for structured document retrieval - Part II: Types, usage and effectiveness. nameOfConference


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    Citations: 2
  • REID JA, Tury S (2004). Information Seeking Behaviour in Distance Learning (poster). Proceedings of ISIC 2004 (Information seeking in Context)

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    Citations: 0
  • LALMAS M, Reid J (2003). Automatic identification of Best Entry Points for Focussed Structured Document Retrievel (Poster). CIKM Conference on Information and Knowledge Management, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

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    Citations: 0
  • Kazai G, Lalmas M, Reid J (2003). Construction of a test collection for the focussed retrieval of structured documents. nameOfConference

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    Citations: 1
  • REID JA, Dunlop M (2003). Evaluation of a Prototype Interface for Structured Document Retrieval. Proceedings of HCI 2003 (Human Computer Interaction)

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  • Finesilver K, Reid J (2003). User behaviour in the context of structured documents. nameOfConference

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    Citations: 4